77 Which decade of hypercars was faster: 1980s, 1990s, or 2000s?

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(Photo Courtesy of Classic & Sports Car)

Contrary to popular belief, the hypercar trend did not start with hybrids of the 2010s. It started way earlier than that. In fact, the Bugatti Veyron was the first full-on hypercar, but there were plenty of supercars that had top-dog performance, which we could also legitimately call "hypercars," even if that term didn't exist back in the good old days.

The McLaren F1 is faster than the Ferrari Enzo. Many hypercars of the 1990s were actually closer to the Ferrari Enzo in top speed than they were to the F40 or F50. The Jaguar XJ220 and Bugatti EB110SS are two notorious examples of hypercars that were almost as fast, or even faster than, the Enzo.

Theoretically, the XJ220 and EB110SS could max out at 223 and 221 mph, their lowest top speeds were 210 and 216 mph, so averaging them out results in 217 mph and 218 mph, respectively.

However, the Jaguar did not use catalytic converters in the top speed test, so the real top speed is 213 mph, which is still higher than the Porsche Carrera GT.

There are many, many supercars, but few hypercars. Exotic materials and radical stylings are what make hypercars so rare and unique.

I will bring up simulation numbers on the respective pages of these cars.

3w ago by hostboy
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hostboy  3w ago

Kinda off topic here but still semi-related to hypercars, but here's how I see it (for cars weighing less than 4k-lb):

1985-2000 classifications:
Supercar— ¼mile at 115-129mph in 12 to 13sec — usually starting price (before taxes and fees) was US$100,000—399,995

Here you have cars like Porsche 959, Ferrari GTO and F40 and F50, Bugatti EB110 GT, Lamborghini Diablo, Cizeta V16T, Porsche 993 GT2, and Vector W8TT. To an extent, some Euro-spec 360 Modena and US-spec Viper GTS press cars as well.

Hypercar— ¼mile at 130+mph in less than 12sec — usually starting price (before taxes and fees) was US$400,000+

Here you have cars like Euro-spec F40 without cats, McLaren F1 (all versions), Bugatti EB110 SS, Dauer 962 Le Mans, Jaguar XJ220 S. In addition: Porsche 911 GT1 (993/996), Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, and any of those other dangerous GT1 prep cars.

2001-2012 classifications:
Supercar— ¼mile at 120-134mph in 11 to 12sec — usually starting price (before taxes and fees) was US$150,000—599,995

Here you have cars like Porsche GT2 (996/997) and Carrera GT, Ferrari 430/458 and Enzo, Ford GT, Corvette Z06 and ZR1, Viper SRT-10, SLR McLaren, Audi R8 V10, Lamborghini Gallardo (some versions) and Murciélago, Mosler MT900, naturally aspirated Saleen S7, Koenigsegg CC8S, and a few others I forgot to mention.

Grand tourers may include Mercedes-AMG SL65, Ferrari 599, and Porsche 997 Turbo S.

Those in the last two years of the 2001-12 era of the supercar segment include Aventador, F12, and MP4-12C; but barely out of hypercar reach.

Hypercar— ¼mile at 135+mph in less than 11sec — usually starting price (before taxes and fees) was US$600,000+

Here you have Saleen S7TT, Koenigsegg CCR (and updated version CCX), Bugatti Veyron, and to a lesser extent Ferrari Enzo (which honestly plays in both segments). Even McLaren F1 and Dauer 962LM from the '90s would still be qualified to play in this league.

2013-2020 classifications:
Supercar— ¼mile at 130-144mph in 10 to 11sec — usually starting price (before taxes and fees) was US$200,000—799,995
Hypercar— ¼mile at 145+mph in less than 10sec — usually starting price (before taxes and fees) was US$800,000+

2021-present classifications:
Supercar— ¼mile at 135-149mph in 10 to 11sec — usually starting price (before taxes and fees) is US$200,000—799,995
Hypercar— ¼mile at 150+mph in less than 10sec — usually starting price (before taxes and fees) is US$800,000+

For cars weighing more than 4000 pounds, you must take dynamics into account. Sure, a standard Chiron or an electric car launches like a hypercar, but neither will ever outperform a lightweight track monster on a circuit.

This is why cars like the Viper ACR, Senna, and GT2 RS are often faster than supercars and even some hypercars on the track. This is why a Hellcat won't actually beat its supposed Chevy, Cadillac and Ford rivals on a track, because dynamics aren't taken into account; too much focus on horsepower; basically a budget Bugatti.

I went by US presidential (both campaign and incumbency) years, so 1984-2000 -> 2001-2012 -> 2013-2020 -> 2021-present.

Back then, Corvette ZR1 (C4) and 911 Turbo (964/993) weren't considered as "supercars." These days however the ZR1 and Turbo S (and even smaller siblings like Z06, GT3, and Turbo) are supercars because Chevy and Porsche accidentally caught up with their naturally-exotic rivals.

NOTE: I would consider some of those Ultras and Radicals and the like to be kit cars.


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helmut  3w ago

porsche>ferrari


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Shwingbob  3w ago

unrelated but could I add the Radford type 62


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Michael Schumacher  3w ago

This post has received too much negative feedback and is hidden. Click here to show it anyway.


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shitpost  3w ago

this post is a bit of shitpost


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AaronVector  3w ago

No matter what anyone says, the Mclaren F1 created the hypercar segment and that's final.


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hostboy  3w ago

Acceleration stats of each classic McLaren hypercar (from a standing start):
....................................100km/h->200km/h->250km/h->300km/h
F1....................................3.2sec.......8.9sec.....12.8sec.....19.3sec
F1 LM/HDK.....................2.9sec.......8.5sec.....13.6sec.....22.3sec
F1 GT...............................4.1sec.....10.7sec.....17.0sec.....30.6sec
SLR..................................3.6sec.....10.3sec.....16.9sec.....28.5sec
SLR 722 Edition..............3.6sec.....10.0sec.....16.1sec.....27.7sec
SLR Stirling Moss...........3.4sec.......8.9sec.....13.8sec.....22.2sec
[Acceleration stats courtesy of X-Engineer.]

Standing distance times for each classic McLaren hypercar (from a standing start):
........................................400m........................................1000m
F1.................................11.3sec.......................................19.4sec
F1 LM/HDK..................11.1sec.......................................19.3sec
F1 GT............................12.1sec.......................................20.8sec
SLR...............................11.8sec.......................................20.7sec
SLR 722 Edition...........11.7sec.......................................20.6sec
SLR Stirling Moss........11.4sec.......................................19.3sec

All distance figures estimated using these methods:
for 400m runs: [100km/h ET+200km/h ET]/([100km/h ET+200km/h ET]x11
for 1000m runs: [100km/h ET+200km/h ET]/([100km/h ET+200km/h ET]x11 x 2 or 2.1 depending on the car's performance level

Power-to-weight ratios (including 75kg driver + downforce):
F1...........................(627x(.850/.850))/1.215) = 516mhp/tonne
F1 LM/HDK............(680x(.850/.850))/1.729) = 393mhp/tonne
F1 GT......................(627x(.850/.850))/1.787) = 351mhp/tonne
SLR.........................(626x(.718/.850))/1.768) = 299mhp/tonne
SLR 722 Edition......(650x(.850/.850))/1.724) = 377mhp/tonne
SLR Stirling Moss...(650x(.850/.850))/1.626) = 400mhp/tonne

Note for the standard McLaren F1: I applied a 1.00 rear axle coefficient only from up to 100km/h, a 0.75 from 100-200km/h, and then a 0.50 from 200km/h on. The simulator never seemed to naturally get the F1's figures right.

Unlike many supercars, the standard F1 has zero downforce. However, the F1 LM has an estimated 592kg of downforce per my (but technically HPWizard's) calculations. Also, the F1 GT is based on the F1 LM, so it should have similar drag because it has larger exterior dimensions despite having a less active wing.

Note for Mercedes SLR: I did the unusual; instead of having the rear axle coefficient set at 1.0 (which resulted in a very unusual 3.0s 0-100km/h time and an especially impossible 9.2s 0-200km/h time), I had it set at 0.8.

Used rear axle coefficient of 0.6 for 0-200km/h run then reverted to 0.8 and messed with the driveline efficiency (0.718 instead of 0.85) a little to accomodate for the 0-200 time (semi-initially, of 11.3s). However, since I adjusted the rolling resistance from the default 0.011 to a sub-zero (-.031 to be precise), the top speed is back up to normal. Now, the 0-200 time is 10.3s. Rolling resistance is similar at -.039 for SLR Stirling Moss.

However, the rolling resistance still remains 0.011 for the SLR 722 Edition, along with the driveline efficiency of 0.85 for both SLR 722 Edition and SLR Stirling Moss.


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FastestLaps  3w ago

This is all about semantics. Different people will assign different meaning to to the term "hypercar". I define Porsche 918, LaFerrari and P1 as the first generation hypercars. Everything before were supercars and everything that is direct successor of these 3 are hypercars (SF90 for example).

That's just my own arbitrary thinking.

 

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ChironSS  3w ago

Pagani Zonda was and still is epically impressive.


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:::::::::::::::::::::::::  1w ago

The SF90 Stradale, though I consider to be a hypercar, would be a bad example to use in your specific explanation where it says direct successors, as the SF90 Stradale doesn’t replace any of these cars.

The SF90 Stradale is a new segment. It sits in between the production V12 and the special V12 segment.

Segment 1 = LaFerrari successor
Segment 2 = SF90 Stradale
Segment 3 = 812 Superfast, 812 Competizione
Segment 4 = F8 Tributo


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hostboy  6d ago @:::::::::::::::::::::::::

Agreed. SF90 Stradale will have new competitor, and that is Valhalla.


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196ss  5d ago @:::::::::::::::::::::::::

"The SF90 Stradale, though I consider to be a hypercar, would be a bad example to use in your specific explanation where it says direct successors, as the SF90 Stradale doesn’t replace any of these cars."

I'd say that SF90 is the direct successor of Porsche 918.


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hostboy  5d ago @196ss

Uhhh, what? Does 918 have two competitors from Ferrari? Or was that supposed to be a joke?


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196ss  5d ago @hostboy

I was quite serious.
Ferrari saw that the 918 was in many aspects more efficient than the Laferrari, so they decided to use the 918 conception.
In my mind, SF90 is the direct successor to 918, and just like the Porsche in its day, it is now setting records on tracks and in a straight line.

Besides the next Porsche's hypercar will most likely be full electric, so could be the 918 successor only a stretch.


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hostboy  5d ago @196ss

Then surely Speedtail is successor to LaFerrari.

Porsche paid McLaren and Ferrari to build successors to 918 along with P1 and LaFerrari.


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196ss  5d ago @hostboy

giggling-trollface.jpg?550x800m


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hostboy  5d ago @196ss

918 was more of a moderate hypercar than a strong competitor for P1 and LaF in my opinion. Outside of its electric motors which stop at 235km/h, the 918 can't even keep up with the Aventador.


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196ss  5d ago @hostboy

Well, SF90 is also a kind of the transitional link between hyper- and supercars, because nowadays 1000 hp are no longer seem impressive enough to be definitely considered as a hypercar.


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hostboy  3w ago

Acceleration stats of each classic Porsche hypercar (from a standing start):
....................................100km/h->200km/h->250km/h->300km/h
959..................................3.4sec.....12.0sec.....20.3sec.....37.6sec
959 S...............................3.2sec.....10.6sec.....17.3sec.....29.8sec
911 GT1..........................3.2sec.....10.4sec.....18.3sec.....46.5sec
Carrera GT.......................3.1sec.....10.1sec.....16.8sec.....31.4sec
[Acceleration stats courtesy of X-Engineer.]

Standing distance times for each classic Porsche hypercar (from a standing start):
........................................400m........................................1000m
959..............................12.0sec.......................................21.4sec
959 S...........................11.6sec.......................................20.9sec
911 GT1......................11.6sec.......................................20.9sec
Carrera GT...................11.5sec......................................20.8sec

Power-to-weight ratios (including 75kg driver + downforce):
959..............(450/1.695) = 265mhp/tonne
959 S...........(515/1.695) = 304mhp/tonne
911 GT1......(544/1.745) = 312mhp/tonne
Carrera GT...(612/1.863) = 329mhp/tonne


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hostboy  3w ago

Acceleration stats of each classic Ferrari hypercar (from a standing start):
....................................100km/h->200km/h->250km/h->300km/h
288 GTO EU....................3.4sec......11.8sec.....20.7sec.....40.6sec
288 GTO US....................4.8sec......15.6sec.....27.6sec...................
F40 EU............................3.3sec.......11.4sec.....19.7sec.....39.6sec
F40 EU no cats...............3.2sec.......10.8sec.....18.4sec.....36.1sec
F40 US............................3.9sec.......13.1sec.....22.1sec.....42.4sec
F50..................................4.0sec.......12.0sec.....20.1sec.....38.2sec
Enzo................................3.2sec.........9.3sec.....16.1sec.....28.9sec
MC12..............................3.5sec........10.9sec....18.9sec.....36.5sec
[Acceleration stats courtesy of X-Engineer.]

Standing distance times for each classic Ferrari hypercar (from a standing start):
........................................400m........................................1000m
288 GTO EU...............11.9sec........................................21.3sec
288 GTO US...............13.2sec........................................22.5sec
F40 EU........................11.8sec........................................21.2sec
F40 EU no cats...........11.7sec........................................21.0sec
F40 US........................12.0sec........................................21.7sec
F50..............................12.2sec........................................21.3sec
Enzo............................11.4sec........................................20.4sec
MC12..........................11.8sec........................................21.0sec

Most performance distance numbers (listed above) were estimated using the following measures:*
for 400m-> 100km/h time+200km/h time/(100km/h time+200km/h time)x11
for 1000m-> 100km/h time+200km/h time/(100km/h time+200km/h time)x11x2.1

*With the special exception of the US-spec F40, since it has shorter gearing, so I used the 10.5 factor instead of the 11.0 factor, with the multiplication factor next to it being 2.2 instead of the normal 2.1.

Power-to-weight ratios (including 75kg driver + downforce):
288 GTO EU.......(400/0.85)/1.656 = 284mhp/tonne
288 GTO US.......(400/1.00)/1.656 = 242mhp/tonne
F40 EU................(478/1.00)/1.758 = 272mhp/tonne
F40 EU no cats...(478/0.85)/1.758 = 320mhp/tonne
F40 US................(484/1.00)/1.873 = 258mhp/tonne
F50......................(520/1.00)/1.850 = 281mhp/tonne
Enzo....................(660/1.00)/2.215 = 298mhp/tonne
MC12..................(633/1.00)/2.232 = 284mhp/tonne


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Corvolet3  3w ago

That F50 is probably my favorite Ferrari "hyper"car. Sure it's slower than even the F40, but that engine noise paired with the 6 speed manual is something I'd never switch for.

It's probably Need For Speed 2 nostalgia that's pulling me to the car.


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467578  3w ago

Gordon Murray once said that the F40 is “like a big go-kart with a plastic body on it”. This criticism came out of the mouth of the man who invented the fastest car of its time, and one of the F40’s mightiest rival – The Mclaren F1.


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hostboy  3w ago

Let me explain, so I am talking about hypercars as a whole; not one specific car that lead the decade. Obviously each decade had its own monster: the '80s* had the F40, the '90s had the F1, and the '00s had the Veyron.

*The Ruf CTR and Callaway Sledgehammer don't technically count as they used the same exact chassis as the mainstream big-name sports cars and weren't really their own production-line cars.